About the Project



The Syracuse Climate Change Garden, established in the Fall of 2013, was designed as a long-term climate change experiment. The garden incorporates 33 common trees and shrubs native to central New York (CNY), southern, and western regions of the United States, as well as some native to Europe and East Asia to examine the impact of invasive species. There are 9 core species groups, including maples, oaks, pines, birches, firs, magnolias, hemlocks, witch hazel, and viburnums . The garden is an outdoor laboratory that will be used in Biology courses to study how climate change influences the growth and vitality of trees and shrubs adapted to vastly different conditions. The changes in climate for CNY are expected to be significant. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2014) predicts CNY heat indices will become similar to that of South Carolina by the end of the century. By studying the long-term responses of these important tree and shrub species planted in the garden, students will be able to examine how climate change affect local dominants and what species they will likely be replaced by.


Magnolias

Cucumber Magnolia (Magnolia acuminata)

Distribution

Cucumbertree (Magnolia acuminata), also called cucumber magnolia, yellow cucumbertree, yellow-flower magnolia, and mountain magnolia, is the most widespread and hardiest of the eight native magnolia species in the United States, and the only magnolia native to Canada. They reach their greatest size in moist soils of slopes and valleys in the mixed hardwood forests of the southern Appalachian Mountains. Growth is fairly rapid and maturity is reached in 80 to 120 years. The soft, durable, straight-grained wood is similar to yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera). They are often marketed together and used for pallets, crates, furniture, plywood, and special products. The seeds are eaten by birds and rodents and this tree is suitable for planting in parks. Read more

Current Distribution

Distribution

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Sweetbay Magnolia (Magnolia virginiana)

Star Magnolia

Sweetbay (Magnolia uirginiana), also called swamp-bay, white-bay, laurel, swamp, or sweet magnolia, and swamp-laurel, is at times confused with loblolly-bay (Gordonia lasianthus) and redbay (Perseaborbonia), since "bay" is the term commonly used in referring to any of these three species. Sweetbay is readily distinguished from the others by the white pubescence of its lower leaf surfaces (11,21). Sweetbay is a slow-growing small to medium-sized tree found on wet, often acid soils of coastal swamps and low lands of the Coastal Plains. The soft aromatic straight-grained wood is easily worked and finishes well, so it is much used for veneer, boxes, and containers. Its flowers and foliage make it an attractive landscape tree. Read more


Current Distribution

Star Magnolia

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Star Magnolia (Magnolia stellata)

Star Magnolia

Star Magnolia is the hardiest of the Magnolias. It is a small tree or large shrub, 15 to 20 feet tall with a 10 to 15-foot spread. Typically branching close to the ground, the multi-stemmed form develops with a dense head of foliage. Star Magnolia makes a wonderful patio, lawn specimen or accent tree. Lower foliage can be removed to show off the trunk and to create more of a tree-form. Otherwise, the persistent lower branches and oval to round form lend a "large bush" look to the plant. When planted against a dark background, the branching pattern and light gray trunk will show off nicely, particularly when lit up at night. The leafless winter silhouette looks great shadowed on a wall by a spotlight at night. The white flowers are produced in spring before the leaves appear, even on young plants. Flowers are usually not as sensitive to cold as Saucer Magnolia, but they can still be injured if cold weather arrives during flowering. Read more


Current Distribution

Star Magnolia

Maples

Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)

Star Magnolia

Sugar maple (Acer saccharum), sometimes called hard maple or rock maple, is one of the largest and more important of the hardwoods. It grows on approximately 12.5 million hectares (31 million acres) or 9 percent of the hardwood land and has a net volume of about 130 million m3 (26 billion fbm) or 6 percent of the hardwood sawtimber volume in the United States. The greatest commercial volumes are presently in Michigan, New York, Maine, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania (53). In most regions, both the sawtimber and growing stock volumes are increasing, with increased production of saw logs, pulpwood, and more recently, firewood. Read more



Current Distribution

Distribution

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Black Maple (Acer nigrum)

Star Magnolia

Black maple (Acer nigrum), also called black sugar maple, hard maple, or rock maple, is closely related to sugar maple (A. saccharum) in habit, range, and quality and use of wood. Black maple grows on a variety of soils, but most commonly on moist soils of river bottoms in mixed hardwood forests. It grows rapidly in early life, then slowly and may live 200 years. Black maple is cut and sold with sugar maple as hard maple lumber. The trees can be tapped for sap for making maple syrup. Young trees are often browsed by deer, and buds and seeds are eaten by birds. Occasionally this tree is used as an ornamental. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Bigtooth Maple (Acer grandidentatum)

Star Magnolia


This North American native reaches 50 feet in height with a broad, spreading canopy and grayishbrown bark which may be either smooth or scaly. The 2 to 5-inch-diameter, lustrous, dark green, lobed leaves which have a pale underside are noted for their striking brilliance in fall, when they change into beautiful shades of red, orange, and yellow before dropping. The insignificant, hairy, yellow flowers appear among the leaves in late spring and are followed by the production of one-inch-long, winged seeds. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Paperbark Maple (Acer griseum)

Star Magnolia

The paperbark maple is a slow-growing and long-living deciduous tree that will attain a height of 20-30 feet with a spread of 15-25 feet. It is hardy in many regions of the Pacific Northwest (zones 4-8). A purely ornamental tree, it is suitable for small gardens, near patios and decks, and in median strips and parking lots.
The paperback maple is stately, growing upright without any drooping, and has an oval, irregular, relatively open crown – although it may become “twiggy” on the inside. This open crown provides filtered, not dense, shade – making it suitable for plantings underneath. In the early spring, dark purplish-green leaf buds unfurl to three-lobed leaves that are three to six inches, with blunt-toothed margins. Later spring and summer leaves are dark bright green to bluish-green on top with frosty silver undersides. Also in the spring, the paperbark maple flowers – although these flowers are often insignificant, hanging in non-showy inchlong clusters of pale yellow-green. Flowers give way to attractive one- to three-inch reddish-brown winged fruits in the fall that may persist on the tree into winter, and that spread widely when dispersing – resulting in little litter beneath. Read more

More info

Oaks

Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra)

Star Magnolia


Northern red oak (Quercus rubra), also known as common red oak, eastern red oak, mountain red oak, and gray oak, is widespread in the East and grows on a variety of soils and topography, often forming pure stands. Moderate to fast growing, this tree is one of the more important lumber species of red oak and is an easily transplanted, popular shade tree with good form and dense foliage. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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White Oak (Quercus alba)

Star Magnolia

White oak (Quercus alba) is an outstanding tree among all trees and is widespread across eastern North America. The most important lumber tree of the white oak group, growth is good on all but the driest shallow soils. Its high-grade wood is useful for many things, an important one being staves for barrels, hence the name stave oak. The acorns are an important food for many kinds of wildlife. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Shingle Oak (Quercus imbricaria)

Star Magnolia


This stately, decidudous native tree grows 40 to 60 feet tall (occassionally 80 to 100 feet) with an equal or greater spread, its broad, strong branches casting medium to deep shade below the rounded canopy. The smooth, four to siz-inch-long by one to two-inch-wide leaves start out life with a red to yellow cast, deepen to a rich green through the summer, then turn shades of yellow and rust again in the fall before dropping. Some leaves will persist on the tree throughout the winter. In May or early June the flowers appear as drooping yellowish-green catkins and are followed by the production of one-half to one-inch-long, dark brown acorns.  Read more

Current Distribution

Distribution

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Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii)

Star Magnolia


Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii) is one of the largest southern red oaks. Other common names are spotted oak, Schneck oak, Shumard red oak, southern red oak, and swamp red oak. It is a lowland tree and grows scattered with other hardwoods on moist, well-drained soils associated with large and small streams. It grows moderately fast and produces acorns every 2 to 4 years that are used by wildlife for food. The wood is superior to most red oaks, but it is mixed indiscriminately with other red oak lumber and used for the same products. This tree makes a handsome shade tree.


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Sawtooth Oak (Quercus acutissima)

Star Magnolia


Sawtooth Oak is an attractive, large, deciduous tree, 50 feet in height or taller with a rounded, broad, pyramidal shape (Fig. 1). The leaves are similar to chestnut (Castanea) and have small bristles at the edges. New spring leaves are an attractive bright yellow-green and fall color varies from dull yellow to brown. Brown leaves hang onto the tree into the winter which makes the tree unattractive to some people. The trunk and bark of Sawtooth Oak are gray-brown and deeply furrowed. The trunk flares out at the base lifting sidewalks and curbing if planted in tree lawns less than eight feet wide or too close to walks. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution


Pines

Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus)

Star Magnolia


Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus), also called northern white pine, is one of the most valuable trees in eastern North America. Before the arrival of white men, virgin stands contained an estimated 3.4 billion m³ (600 billion fbm) of lumber. By the late 1800's most of those vast stands had been logged. Because it is among the more rapid growing northern forest conifers, it is an excellent tree for reforestation projects, landscaping, and Christmas trees and has the distinction of having been one of the more widely planted American trees. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa)

Star Magnolia


Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), also called western yellow pine, is one of the most widely distributed pines in western North America. A major source of timber, ponderosa pine forests are also important as wildlife habitat, for recreational use, and for esthetic values. Within its extensive range, two varieties of the species currently are recognized: Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa(Pacific ponderosa pine) (typical) and var. scopulorum (Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine). Arizona pine (P. arizonica),sometimes classified as a variety of ponderosa pine, is presently recognized as a separate species. Read more

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Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta)

Star Magnolia


Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is a two-needled pine of the subgenus Pinus. The species has been divided geographically into four varieties: P. contorta var. contorta, the coastal form known as shore pine, coast pine, or beach pine; P. contorta var.bolanderi, a Mendocino County White Plains form in California called Bolander pine; P. contorta var. murrayana in the Sierra Nevada, called Sierra lodgepole pine or tamarack pine; and P. contorta var. latifolia, the inland form often referred to as Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine or black pine. Although the coastal form grows mainly between sea level and 610 m (2,000 ft), the inland form is found from 490 to 3660 m (1,600 to 12,000 ft). Read more


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Virginia Pine (Pinus virginiana)

Star Magnolia


Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) has a definite place among trees of commercial importance in spite of once being considered a "forest weed" and called scrub pine. Also known as Jersey pine and spruce pine, it does so well in reforesting abandoned and cutover lands that it has become a principal source of pulpwood and lumber in the southeast. Virginia pine is commonly a small or medium-sized tree but a record tree has been measured with 81 cm (31.8 in) in d.b.h. and 34.7 m (114 ft) in height.


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Korean Pine (Pinus koraiensis)

Star Magnolia


Pinus koraiensis has a wide distribution in the Russian Far East, northeast China and North Korea. Smaller subpopulations also occur in South Korea and Japan. In the Russian Far East legal and illegal exploitation for its timber has resulted in a decline in its area of occupancy of up to 50% (CITES 2010). In China over-exploitation for its edible nuts and to a lesser extent, its timber is leading to forest degradation in some areas (Tang 2010). There is little species specific information about its status in North Korea although generalized reports into the state of the environment (UNEP 2003, Hayes 2009) and satellite based studies on deforestation in and around areas such as Changbaishan/ Baekdu-san Biosphere Reserves (Tang 2010) indicate that some decline is likely. In South Korea and Japan the small subpopulations are thought to be stable. Despite the continuing exploitation, this species' large distribution and (still) large overall population size means that it does not yet meet the requirements for any of the threatened categories or those for Near Threatened. This situation may change within the next decade should current trends continue. Read more
   

Birches

Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis)

Star Magnolia


Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) is the most valuable of the native birches. It is easily recognized by the yellowish-bronze exfoliating bark for which it is named. The inner bark is aromatic and has a flavor of wintergreen. Other names are gray birch, silver birch, and swamp birch. This slow-growing long-lived tree is found with other hardwoods and conifers on moist well-drained soils of the uplands and mountain ravines. It is an important source of hardwood lumber and a good browse plant for deer and moose. Other wildlife feed on the buds and seeds. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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River Birch (Betula nigra)

Star Magnolia


The most beautiful of American trees-that's what Prince Maximilian thought of river birch (Betula nigra) when he toured North America before he became the short-lived Emperor of Mexico (11). Also known as red birch, water birch, or black birch (15), it is the only birch whose range includes the southeastern coastal plain and is also the only spring-fruiting birch. Although the wood has limited usefulness, the tree's beauty makes it an important ornamental, especially at the northern and western extremes of its natural range. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Sweet Birch (Betula lenta)

Star Magnolia


Sweet birch (Betula lenta), also commonly referred to as black birch or cherry birch, was at one time the only source of oil of wintergreen. It is the aroma of wintergreen emanating from crushed leaves and broken twigs to which this birch owes its common name, sweet. Its specific name, lenta, is derived from the tough yet flexible twigs that characterize the species. The wood is also unique. When exposed to air it darkens to a color resembling mahogany and, in times past, was used as an inexpensive substitute for the more valued tropical wood. Read more


Current Distribution

Distribution

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Firs

Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea)

Star Magnolia


Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) is one of the more important conifers in the northern United States and in Canada. Within its range it may also be referred to as balsam, Canadian balsam, eastern fir, and bracted balsam fir. It is a small to medium-sized tree used primarily for pulp and light frame construction, and it is one of the most popular Christmas trees. Wildlife rely extensively on this tree for food and shelter. Read more


Current Distribution

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White Fir
(Abies concolor)

 

Long considered undesirable for timber, white fir (Abies concolor) is finally being recognized as a highly productive, valuable tree species. White fir reaches its best development and maximum size in the central Sierra Nevada of California, where the record specimen is 58.5 m (192 ft) tall and measures 271 cm (106.6 in) in d.b.h. (7). Large but not exceptional specimens, on good sites, range from 40 to 55 m (131 to 180 ft) tall and from 99 to 165 cm (39 to 65 in) in d.b.h. in California and southwestern Oregon and to 41 m (134 ft) tall and 124 cm (49 in) in d.b.h. in Arizona and New Mexico (37).

Needle form and terpene content vary sufficiently across the wide range of the species to warrant definition of two varieties: the typical var. concolor, white fir, often called Rocky Mountain white fir, occupies the eastern and southwestern part of the range; var.lowiana (Gord.) Lemm., California white fir, grows in the western range (31). In this paper, "white fir" applies to both varieties. Read more


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Korean Fir (Abies koreana)

Star Magnolia


The Korean Fir (Abies koreana) has an estimated area of occupancy (AOO) of about 12 km².  It occurs in four fragmented locations; Mt. Gaya, Mt. Chiri and Mt. Togyu on the mainland and Mt. Halla on the remote Jeju Island. The distances between each location range from 40–250 km and are likely to be too great to allow for effective gene flow. There is clear and documented evidence of a continuing decline in the AOO and quality of habitat due to a number of factors which include the effects of climate change, pathogen attack and on Mt. Halla the invasion of pines and bamboo (Sasa). For these reasons A. koreana has been assessed as Endangered. The conservation status of this species needs to be carefully monitored as if there is a further reduction of the current AOO of 12 km² to 10 km² or below, then it will qualify as Critically Endangered. Read more

Current Distribution

For more information, visit Green Lakes Journal

Hemlocks

Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)

Star Magnolia


Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), also called Canada hemlock or hemlock spruce, is a slow-growing long-lived tree which unlike many trees grows well in shade. It may take 250 to 300 years to reach maturity and may live for 800 years or more. A tree measuring 193 cm (76 in) in d.b.h. and 53.3 m (175 ft) tall is among the largest recorded. Hemlock bark was once the source of tannin for the leather industry; now the wood is important to the pulp and paper industry. Many species of wildlife benefit from the excellent habitat that a dense stand of hemlock provides. This tree also ranks high for ornamental planting. Read more

Current Distribution

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Carolina Hemlock
(Tsuga caroliniana)

Star Magnolia


The Carolina hemlock is a tall, slender, elegant tree, one of 10 evergreen conifers of the genus Tsuga. It can grow to 70 ft. tall and 1.5 ft. to 2 ft. in diameter, or more. Its crown is pyramidal and airy with drooping branches. The bark on young trees is a smooth red-brown that becomes scaly and fissured with age. On older trees, the outer bark is a purplish-gray and the inner bark is reddish-brown. Its leaves are needlelike, 0.5 in. to 0.75 in. long, flat, somewhat shiny, and widely spreading, they spread from the twigs in all directions, giving an appearance reminiscent of a bottle brush. The needles are dark green above and have two white stomatal bands beneath. The trees are monoecious, bearing both male and female cones on the same tree, near the branch tips. Cones of the Carolina hemlock are ovoid to oblong and light brown, with scales longer than they are wide, and spreading widely relative to the cone axis. There are no known subspecies, varieties or forms of Tsuga caroliniana. Read more


Current Distribution

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Northern Japanese Hemlock (Tsuga diversifolia)

Star Magnolia


Tsuga diversifolia is an evergreen tree (to 25 m) which occurs in the mountains at altitudes between 700 m and 2,000 m a.s.l., on usually podzolic soils developed on volcanic or igneous rock. The climate is cool, with cold, snowy winters and abundant rainfall in summer (annual precipitation 1,000 mm to 2,500 mm). It is in many areas the most common tree species in mixed coniferous forests, being very shade tolerant. Other common conifers are Picea jezoensis, Abies homolepis, A. veitchii, A. mariesii (at high elevations), Larix kaempferi, Pinus parviflora, Thuja standishii, and Thujopis dolabratavar. hondae; broad-leaved trees are e.g. Betula ermanii, B. corylifolia, Sorbus japonica,Alnus hirsuta var. sibirica, and Quercus mongolica var. grosseserrata. Rhododendronspp. and/or Sasa spp. may form a dense undergrowth in the shrub layer, in other, very wet areas only thick moss layers carpet fallen logs and the forest floor. It regenerates very well as it can tolerate dense shade; forms pure stands in places. Read more


   

Witchhazel

Common Witchhazel (Hamamelis virginiana)

Star Magnolia


Witch-Hazel grows best in sun or partial shade and in light, moist soil (Fig. 1). The plant tolerates some drought and grows slowly. It grows 20 to 30 feet tall and spreads 15 to 25 feet forming a multistemmed, shrubby, round, somewhat asymmetrical ball. Removing the lower branches helps produce a more tree-form multistemmed specimen but regular minor pruning will be required to maintain it in this form since the plant suckers freely from the base of the trunk. Read more


Current Distribution



Vernal Witchhazel (Hamamelis vernalis)

Star Magnolia


Hamamelis vernalis is restricted to the Ozark Plateau of Missouri, Oklahoma, and Arkansas, often in close proximity with the more widespread H . virginiana . It is difficult to explain the restricted occurrence of H . vernalis in the Ozark area, although ancient geology of the area, with predominently Paleozoic rocks, makes it a well-known refugium. Hamamelis vernalis and H . virginiana are sympatric, sometimes growing within 30 m of each other, yet their identity is maintained, and the two species are easily distinguished through a composite of diagnostic characters (J. L. Bradford and D. L. Marsh 1977). Hamamelis vernalis shows an unusual color range of the flowers. Plants growing side by side commonly differ in flower color, varying from orange to deep red or, occasionally, deep yellow. Sometimes flower color varies on the same plant; e.g., petals that are initially deep red can later fade to yellow. Read more


Current Distribution

 



Chinese Witchhhazel
(Hamamelis mollis)

Star Magnolia


Chinese Witch-hazel is a small, slow-growing, deciduous tree capable of reaching 20 feet high and wide but is more often seen at 10 to 15 feet (Fig. 1). The three to six-inch-long, dull, gray/green leaves will usually put on a showy display in fall, as the dying leaves change to shades of yellow and orange before dropping. The long-lasting, showy, yellow flowers appear in early spring and are quite fragrant. However, they may occasionally be injured by cold temperatures (-10 degrees F.). These blooms are followed by the production of inconspicuous, green (turning black) fruits which persist on the tree. Read more


Click to learn more at eFlora

Viburnum

Sweet Viburnum (Viburnum lentago)

Star Magnolia

A large native tree-like shrub, occasionally found in North Dakota wooded areas. Attractive for its shiny foliage, red fall color and fruit display. Read more


Current Distribution



Blackhaw Viburnum (Viburnum prunifolium)

Star Magnolia

Viburnum prunifolium is a small tree or large shrub noted for spring flowers, autumn fruits and leaf color, dense twigginess, low shade, and slow growth. Blackhaw Viburnum is useful for wildlife refuge, screen, or naturalized mass planting. Read more


Current Distribution



Linden Viburnum (Viburnum dilatatum)

Star Magnolia

This shrub can grow up to 10 feet tall and equally as wide. The simple, two to five-inch  long deciduous leaves vary in shape and are arranged  oppositely along the branches.

Leaves are dark green until the  fall, when they turn a red, bronze or burgundy color. Small creamy white flower clusters bloom from May to June. Small bright red clusters of fruit appear in the fall and persist through the winter, when they shrivel up like raisins. Read more


Current Distribution

Beech

American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)

Star Magnolia


American beech (Fagus grandifolia) is the only species of this genus in North America. Although beech is now confined to the eastern United States (except for the Mexican population) it once extended as far west as California and probably flourished over most of North America before the glacial period (39). This slow-growing, common, deciduous tree reaches its greatest size in the alluvial soils of the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys and may attain ages of 300 to 400 years. Beech wood is excellent for turning and steam bending. It wears well, is easily treated with preservatives, and is used for flooring, furniture, veneer, and containers. The distinctive triangular nuts are eaten by people and are an important food for wildlife. Read more


Current Distribution

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Cherry

Pin Cherry (Prunus pensylvanica)

Star Magnolia


Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) is a small common tree inhabiting a great variety of lands in the northern part of the United States and Canada. It is sometimes called fire cherry for its value as a reforesting agent after forest fires. It forms pure stands that provide shade for seedlings of slower growing species, then dies off, making way for the new trees. Another common name, bird cherry, reflects the prevalent use of the fruit by birds as food. It is also called northern pin cherry, wild red cherry, and pigeon cherry. The soft porous wood is of little commercial value. Read more


Current Distribution

testing image for scaling

Star Magnolia

Sources

Current Forest Inventory and Analysis:  http://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/atlas/combined/index.php

Distribution:  http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1650-a/

Silvics:  http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm

Plants Database Distribution: https://plants.usda.gov/java/

Plant Facts: http://plantfacts.osu.edu/pdf/0247-1161.pdf (Viburnum prunifolium)

Trees Handbook: http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/trees/handbook/th-3-63.pdf  (Viburnum lentago)

Invasive Species: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/cs/groups/public/documents/document/dcnr_010250.pdf (Viburnum dilatatum)

Natural Heritage Fact Sheet: http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/documents/fstcaroliniana.pdf (Tsuga caroliniana)

Tree Fact Sheet:

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/queacub.pdf  (Quercus acutissima)

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/magkobc.pdf (Magnolia stellata)

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/hamvira.pdf (Hamamelis virginiana)

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/hammola.pdf (Hamamelis mollis)

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/acegraa.pdf (Acer grandidentatum)

http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/queimba.pdf (Quercus imbricaria)

Plant Data Sheet: http://courses.washington.edu/esrm412/protocols/ACGR3.pdf (Acer grandidentatum)

Great Lakes Journal: http://www.hrt.msu.edu/assets/PagePDFs/bert-cregg/korean-fir-w-cover.pdf (Abies koreana)

Oregon.gov: http://www.oregon.gov/odf/urbanforests/docs/featuredtreepaperbarkmaple.pdf (Acer griseum)

eFlora: http://www.efloras.org/index.aspx

IUCN Red List:

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/31244/0 (Abies koreana)

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/full/42433/0 (Tsuga diversifolia)

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/42373/0 (Pinus koraiensis)

Conifer Society: http://conifersociety.org/conifers/conifer/abies/koreana/silberperle/ (Abies koreana)

Plant Facts: http://plantfacts.osu.edu/pdf/0246-12.pdf (Acer griseum)

In the News


Check out the Climate Change Garden in the local media!

  • The Post-Standard
    April 22, 2014
    asked what will our local trees and shrubs look like in 2100?

  • Time Warner Cable News
    May 12, 2014
    provides an overview of the garden and the basic methods with which the garden will be utilized.

  • WRVO Public Media
    May 12, 2014
    spoke with Professor Doug Frank about the living lab experiment and the future goals of the garden.

  • News Channel 9 (ABC)
    May 7, 2014
    discusses the effect of climate change on CNY infrastructure.

  • Syracuse.com
    June 5, 2014
    talks about the unique nature of this garden compared to other universities around the country and the world.

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